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The castles

Living witnesses to the town’s strategic position over the centuries, three emblematic castles stand tall over the town of Preveza and impress the visitor. On the north side is the Castle of Saint Andrew (Iç Kale). Built by the Ottomans in the late 17th century, the Venetians made several improvements to it and it survives in an excellent condition. On the southeast edge of the old town is the castle of Saint George (Yeni Kale), which dates to the early 19th century and is a classic example of the fortifications of Ali Pasha. The almost pentagonal Castle of the Pantocrator (Üç Kale), built in 1807 on the designs of the French colonel Guillaume de Vaudoncourt, stands at a prominent position on a strip of land that controls the entrance to the Ambracian Gulf. Its sea bastions offer a magical view over the sea and the sunset.

Ancient Nicopolis and the museum

A symbolic city in the showdown between East and West and for Roman domination in the Mediterranean, ancient Nicopolis is spread out over a huge area of 6 km, to the north of Preveza. It was founded by Octavian Augustus, who later became Roman emperor, in memory of his victory over the joint fleet of Antony and Cleopatra in the famous battle of Actium in 31 BC. Its brilliant, millennia-old history has left its mark until today in the amazingly well-preserved monuments, such as the Roman and Byzantine walls, baths, theatre, Odeon, Nymphaion, Monument to Augustus and the six Early Christian basilicas from the 5th and 6th centuries with their excellent mosaics. The New Archaeological Museum of Nicopolis is located close to the archaeological site. Inside, you can follow the history of this great city and the daily life of its people, through the wonderful artefacts and works of art.

Clock tower

Preveza’s most famous street is a pedestrianized lane that ascends through the Old Town, with its atmospheric coffee houses and picturesque tavernas. The “Devil’s Bazaar”, to give it its Greek name, was a symbol of the town’s folk culture over the centuries and is today a popular area for recreation. The legend behind the name is told on three marble plaques on the front of a local building. At the top of the street is the house in which the poet Kostas Karyotakis lived.

The castles

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Living witnesses to the town’s strategic position over the centuries, three emblematic castles stand tall over the town of Preveza and impress the visitor. On the north side is the Castle of Saint Andrew (Iç Kale). Built by the Ottomans in the late 17th century, the Venetians made several improvements to it and it survives in an excellent condition. On the southeast edge of the old town is the castle of Saint George (Yeni Kale), which dates to the early 19th century and is a classic example of the fortifications of Ali Pasha. The almost pentagonal Castle of the Pantocrator (Üç Kale), built in 1807 on the designs of the French colonel Guillaume de Vaudoncourt, stands at a prominent position on a strip of land that controls the entrance to the Ambracian Gulf. Its sea bastions offer a magical view over the sea and the sunset.


Ancient Nicopolis and the museum

preloader
A symbolic city in the showdown between East and West and for Roman domination in the Mediterranean, ancient Nicopolis is spread out over a huge area of 6 km, to the north of Preveza. It was founded by Octavian Augustus, who later became Roman emperor, in memory of his victory over the joint fleet of Antony and Cleopatra in the famous battle of Actium in 31 BC. Its brilliant, millennia-old history has left its mark until today in the amazingly well-preserved monuments, such as the Roman and Byzantine walls, baths, theatre, Odeon, Nymphaion, Monument to Augustus and the six Early Christian basilicas from the 5th and 6th centuries with their excellent mosaics. The New Archaeological Museum of Nicopolis is located close to the archaeological site. Inside, you can follow the history of this great city and the daily life of its people, through the wonderful artefacts and works of art.


Where

Clock tower

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Preveza’s most famous street is a pedestrianized lane that ascends through the Old Town, with its atmospheric coffee houses and picturesque tavernas. The “Devil’s Bazaar”, to give it its Greek name, was a symbol of the town’s folk culture over the centuries and is today a popular area for recreation. The legend behind the name is told on three marble plaques on the front of a local building. At the top of the street is the house in which the poet Kostas Karyotakis lived.


Necromanteion of Acheron

Legends, guesswork and stories of psychoacoustic phenomena even today accompany the most splendid Necromanteion of antiquity, located on a small hill near the village of Mesopotamos. This is the point where the Gates of Hades stood, while the sanctuary became known in the 5th century BC as a place to communicate with the souls of the dead. It was destroyed by the Romans in 167 BC and upon its ruins was built, in the 17th century, the Monastery of St John the Baptist. The Necromanteion was discovered in the 1960s and its crypt can be reached through a grand arched underground tunnel in what is an almost mystical experience. Nearby are the ruins of the ancient Mycenaean town of Ephyra (14th century BC).

Seitan bazaar

Preveza’s most famous street is a pedestrianized lane that ascends through the Old Town, with its atmospheric coffee houses and picturesque tavernas. The “Devil’s Bazaar”, to give it its Greek name, was a symbol of the town’s folk culture over the centuries and is today a popular area for recreation. The legend behind the name is told on three marble plaques on the front of a local building. At the top of the street is the house in which the poet Kostas Karyotakis lived.

Necromanteion of Acheron

preloader
Legends, guesswork and stories of psychoacoustic phenomena even today accompany the most splendid Necromanteion of antiquity, located on a small hill near the village of Mesopotamos. This is the point where the Gates of Hades stood, while the sanctuary became known in the 5th century BC as a place to communicate with the souls of the dead. It was destroyed by the Romans in 167 BC and upon its ruins was built, in the 17th century, the Monastery of St John the Baptist. The Necromanteion was discovered in the 1960s and its crypt can be reached through a grand arched underground tunnel in what is an almost mystical experience. Nearby are the ruins of the ancient Mycenaean town of Ephyra (14th century BC).


Seitan bazaar

preloader
Preveza’s most famous street is a pedestrianized lane that ascends through the Old Town, with its atmospheric coffee houses and picturesque tavernas. The “Devil’s Bazaar”, to give it its Greek name, was a symbol of the town’s folk culture over the centuries and is today a popular area for recreation. The legend behind the name is told on three marble plaques on the front of a local building. At the top of the street is the house in which the poet Kostas Karyotakis lived.